Getting My Point of Veiw

One of the things that will make a book stick to your mind and suck you in a story is how effectively a writer creates a P.O.V. or Point of View, something that can be difficult for me to employ since I started writing as a blogger who primarily gives information to my readers, mostly in an almost technical way. I can write something and address you directly, making sure that you know that I am talking to you, and wish to engage you in a conversation about what I just wrote.

Writing a book, however, is not the same thing for me. Instead of engaging you to participate in a thought or idea, I see a book as something that makes readers see what it’s like to live through another person – something that can be accomplished with a greatly executed P.O.V. I thought I got the general P.O.V. idea, but Kristen’s blog opened my eyes on several points that I didn’t think of.

First-Person Point of View

This is where the “I” becomes a good thing. 1st-person P.O.V. makes the novel more personal, more intimate. You have A front seat on what the main character is thinking about and , if done right, it can get you hooked in as if you’re the main character. It puts the spotlight solely on one person, diminishing other distractions from other casts in the book.

That being said, the fixation can be either very intense or very boring for some readers.

Third-Person Point of View

Two or more people get stage time in the book. The shifting from one perspective to another creates a complexity that adds depth to the story. The characters come alive because a writer can give you an inside look of every emotion and sensation of each character as they interact with one another.

Of course, the shifting can be very confusing, and the multiple perceptions can also be too overpowering.

Omniscient Point of View

This time, there is an “invisible narrator” in the story, someone who is telling you what a character should have felt, or must have felt on a given scene in the book. If you have a complex scene that is far too hard to express because of multiple occurrences, then this will be good.

Personally, I am not a huge fan of the first-person perspective. As Kristen points out, the many “I’s” can be too distracting. Since I am normally used to addressing my readers, it would be hard for me not to make the character feel like a modern-day Narcissus. Aside from that, I have an innate curiosity on what other people think about a current situation, which makes the third-person perspective appealing to me. What I need to figure out is how I will make this P.O.V. work easily so that my book will not turn out like a memoir of a schizophrenic. Omniscient does not appeal to me very much either, because having a character whose reactions and emotions told by a narrator is a tough act to follow through for an inexperienced writer like me. There is a huge risk of my book coming out like a thesis instead of a romance erotica. Imagine having to read through an genre like that with characters having no senses whatsoever. I shudder just thinking about it.

Now, aside from my grammar, I have to keep in mind that I stick to P.O.V. fundamentals… I hope I won’t get overwhelmed with too much information.

 

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Geiko Caveman. Geiko Caveman.

Monday, we talked about the Three Acts of a Writer’s Journey. The first hint we might be tipping into The Apprentice Phase is we hear the word P.O.V. and panic. What is THAT? Prisoners of Vietnam? Pets of Vegans? Pals of Viagra?

We ALL know writing a novel is FAR from easy. We just make it look that way 😉 .

Today, I’m putting on my editor’s hat. Many of you decided to become writers because you love to write. Duh. I’ll even bet most of you, back when you were in school, also made very good grades in English. Thus, you might assume that you naturally know how to write a novel that is fit for successful publication.

Maybe you do. But, if you are anything like me when I started out? You might not know as much as you think you do.

Why?

Our high…

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