A Boy, A Scar and an Epic Fantasy

I also fell in love with the Harry Potter series during its infancy. My mom bought the two installations of the book during her London trip with her boss, but I did not pay it no mind. I was a college student interested in Mills & Boon, what was my mom thinking buying this children’s books for us? When I exhausted all the Penny Jordan and Carol Mortimer romances, I finally gave Harry Potter my full attention – almost a year after my mom bought it. And I was hooked. I regretted not reading it sooner. Even while re-reading it now, I am still drawn inside a magical world that no other book can do for me.

Sadly, since I’ve read the series nearly a hundred times, watching it on screen is like watching a severely truncated movie. I have never watched a single Harry Potter movie from start to finish. And when the casts inevitability became adults, the last movie became painful because Harry was still a young adult in my head.

I have to admit that JK’s success should be an inspiration for us new writers as we have a high probability of getting rejected, not only by editors and publishers, but also by our target audience. What’s hard is convincing ourselves that self-doubt means poor work and productivity as we are already anticipating world-shattering rejection. So what if we got rejected? So what if we the world did not receive our beloved masterpiece with the same love and affection that we gave to our books? Shouldn’t we all be concerned of (heaven forbid) spending our twilight years regretting for the thousandth time that we did not write our book? Sure we may not be as successful as JK Rowling is, her stars are only hers and hers alone. But our stars already said that we should be writers, and that should give us all the push that we need to pick up a pen and paper (as with my case), or let our fingers dance over the keyboard and see our book through from start to finish.

Catching Fireflies

I would be remiss in talking about children’s book authors without mentioning J.K. Rowling and the Harry Potter series. The first Harry Potter book was published when I was barely 30 years old. Still, I was drawn to the description and scooped it up without hesitation. This was long before the hype would begin – the midnight sales with thousands of people dressed as wizards, the movies, the awards. I didn’t know yet that it would be a series of books and that I would pre-order them months in advance and anxiously track the package as it made its way to my doorstep on release day. I didn’t yet know that I would read the first book and fall in love with the idea of writing all over again. I didn’t know that it would rekindle a dream.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (or Philosopher’s Stone depending on which side…

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NaNoWriMo and Novel Writing Tips from the Pros

NaNoWriMo is here again, and you can see a lot of writers gearing up to write their drafts of 50,000+ words to beat the November 30 deadline. I would like to be able to proudly say that I am going to be one of them, but I am not. I am not that confident enough, and I know that I still have a lot to learn. Not to mention I do not have the right resources. We only have one PC in the house, and it’s currently being used as a tool for therapy by someone who is suffering from depression. However, that does not stop me from enjoying some writing tips designed for people to survive NaNoWriMo because these tips can actually be really helpful for someone like me who is writing a book for the first time. More

Getting My Point of Veiw

One of the things that will make a book stick to your mind and suck you in a story is how effectively a writer creates a P.O.V. or Point of View, something that can be difficult for me to employ since I started writing as a blogger who primarily gives information to my readers, mostly in an almost technical way. I can write something and address you directly, making sure that you know that I am talking to you, and wish to engage you in a conversation about what I just wrote.

Writing a book, however, is not the same thing for me. Instead of engaging you to participate in a thought or idea, I see a book as something that makes readers see what it’s like to live through another person – something that can be accomplished with a greatly executed P.O.V. I thought I got the general P.O.V. idea, but Kristen’s blog opened my eyes on several points that I didn’t think of.

First-Person Point of View

This is where the “I” becomes a good thing. 1st-person P.O.V. makes the novel more personal, more intimate. You have A front seat on what the main character is thinking about and , if done right, it can get you hooked in as if you’re the main character. It puts the spotlight solely on one person, diminishing other distractions from other casts in the book.

That being said, the fixation can be either very intense or very boring for some readers.

Third-Person Point of View

Two or more people get stage time in the book. The shifting from one perspective to another creates a complexity that adds depth to the story. The characters come alive because a writer can give you an inside look of every emotion and sensation of each character as they interact with one another.

Of course, the shifting can be very confusing, and the multiple perceptions can also be too overpowering.

Omniscient Point of View

This time, there is an “invisible narrator” in the story, someone who is telling you what a character should have felt, or must have felt on a given scene in the book. If you have a complex scene that is far too hard to express because of multiple occurrences, then this will be good.

Personally, I am not a huge fan of the first-person perspective. As Kristen points out, the many “I’s” can be too distracting. Since I am normally used to addressing my readers, it would be hard for me not to make the character feel like a modern-day Narcissus. Aside from that, I have an innate curiosity on what other people think about a current situation, which makes the third-person perspective appealing to me. What I need to figure out is how I will make this P.O.V. work easily so that my book will not turn out like a memoir of a schizophrenic. Omniscient does not appeal to me very much either, because having a character whose reactions and emotions told by a narrator is a tough act to follow through for an inexperienced writer like me. There is a huge risk of my book coming out like a thesis instead of a romance erotica. Imagine having to read through an genre like that with characters having no senses whatsoever. I shudder just thinking about it.

Now, aside from my grammar, I have to keep in mind that I stick to P.O.V. fundamentals… I hope I won’t get overwhelmed with too much information.

 

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Geiko Caveman. Geiko Caveman.

Monday, we talked about the Three Acts of a Writer’s Journey. The first hint we might be tipping into The Apprentice Phase is we hear the word P.O.V. and panic. What is THAT? Prisoners of Vietnam? Pets of Vegans? Pals of Viagra?

We ALL know writing a novel is FAR from easy. We just make it look that way 😉 .

Today, I’m putting on my editor’s hat. Many of you decided to become writers because you love to write. Duh. I’ll even bet most of you, back when you were in school, also made very good grades in English. Thus, you might assume that you naturally know how to write a novel that is fit for successful publication.

Maybe you do. But, if you are anything like me when I started out? You might not know as much as you think you do.

Why?

Our high…

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My First Doily

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I am currently on the road to recovery from my Menniere’s attack, so no writing for me, or anything that will give me stress. To keep myself occupied, I created this doily thru Crochet Geek’s tutorial. It’s the first doily that I’ve made since 1993,  and I am still on  the lookout for that gorgeous yet so elusive pattern.

I hope this will inspire you to take up, or renew your love affair with crocheting.

See you around.

My Singing Daughter

Okay, let’s take a break for a while. I am so upset because a blog that I spent two days composing using my tablet got trashed because I foolishly updated wirelessly after major adjustments on my pc. I have several posts drafted already, but I would like to get over this intense disappointment. I never did like it when everything I spent hours on went bust. More

Get A Hobby… Now!

Freelancing can be a challenging and exhausting profession, demanding more than just your time and skills in varying degrees of intensity and difficulty. Regardless, the rush that you will get from pushing yourself to the limit for a special or favorite client is as great (or almost as great) as a sugar high. And just like sugar high, a pet project leaves you drained and exhausted once it’s over. That is, if you were able to get the project done before burnout takes the wind out of your sail. More

The Sad Truth

Hi, and thanks again for coming back.

For two days now I have been tending to my garden and updating my gardening blog’s content. I got spurred on because my mom gave me jalapeño and habanero seeds, and my husband loves chili. Yes, we do not have those seeds here in the Philippines, so I went totally ballistic. So, during the course of my blogging about jalapeños, I have discovered a sad truth. There are more people interested in cooking rather than gardening, and they prefer to engage in replying to blogs and sharing social media content on that niche as opposed to gardening. More

After So Long

I would like to say thank you in advance to you for reading my blog. I appreciate the fact that you have taken the time to read this new post, with me taking this blog site foregranted. So sorry about this.

I haven’t been too keen on writing for myself for the last several months. I have a somewhat long-term web writing stint, and all my creative juices are being sucked and exhausted for that project. Needless to say, I miss writing freestyle, and I can only do so by writing in my blog. More

The Next Level

There is this post shared on facebook about why there are math achievers, and how others do not excell in math because of their firm  belief that these whiz kids were genetically gifted with a scientific calculator wired in their brains. Sadly, I am one of them. I believed with a passion that these math geniuses were simply gifted because they make math seem effortless. In fact, I believe still that succesful singers, musicians, and writers get to where they are now because they have talent – something that I wish I have. Large, juicy chunks of it.
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Emotionally Frozen??

I haven’t written much since my grandmother’s death. I could not write anything that is free-flowing and natural like I naturally do in this blog when I started writing again. I can take care of my gardening blog every once in a while, but the thing is, that blog is easy for me. It’s technical and does not warrant much personal and professional sharing of experiences that put me out there just like this blog does. More

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