A Boy, A Scar and an Epic Fantasy

I also fell in love with the Harry Potter series during its infancy. My mom bought the two installations of the book during her London trip with her boss, but I did not pay it no mind. I was a college student interested in Mills & Boon, what was my mom thinking buying this children’s books for us? When I exhausted all the Penny Jordan and Carol Mortimer romances, I finally gave Harry Potter my full attention – almost a year after my mom bought it. And I was hooked. I regretted not reading it sooner. Even while re-reading it now, I am still drawn inside a magical world that no other book can do for me. Sadly, since I’ve read the series nearly a hundred times, watching it on screen is like watching a severely truncated movie. I have never watched a single Harry Potter movie from start to finish. And when the casts inevitability became adults, the last movie became painful because Harry was still a young adult in my head.

I have to admit that JK’s success should be an inspiration for us new writers as we have a high probability of getting rejected, not only by editors and publishers, but also by our target audience. What’s hard is convincing ourselves that self-doubt means poor work and productivity as we are already anticipating world-shattering rejection. So what if we got rejected? So what if we the world did not receive our beloved masterpiece with the same love and affection that we gave to our books? Shouldn’t we all be concerned of (heaven forbid) spending our twilight years regretting for the thousandth time that we did not write our book? Sure we may not be as successful as JK Rowling is, her stars are only hers and hers alone. But our stars already said that we should be writers, and that should give us all the push that we need to pick up a pen and paper (as with my case), or let our fingers dance over the keyboard and see our book through from start to finish.

Catching Fireflies

I would be remiss in talking about children’s book authors without mentioning J.K. Rowling and the Harry Potter series. The first Harry Potter book was published when I was barely 30 years old. Still, I was drawn to the description and scooped it up without hesitation. This was long before the hype would begin – the midnight sales with thousands of people dressed as wizards, the movies, the awards. I didn’t know yet that it would be a series of books and that I would pre-order them months in advance and anxiously track the package as it made its way to my doorstep on release day. I didn’t yet know that I would read the first book and fall in love with the idea of writing all over again. I didn’t know that it would rekindle a dream.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (or Philosopher’s Stone depending on which side…

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